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Parents Guide to the iPhone's Parental Controls

Guest Post from Mary Kay Hoal

Keeping an eye on all of your child’s online activity is close to impossible these days, especially with the recent surge of 3G/4G capable mobile devices.  Smart phones have landed in the hands of almost every tween and teen, and as a result, it has left parents with even more concerns about the instant connectivity that it allows our children…..despite the fact that many of us all rushed out and bought them.  And though we can install parental controls and security software on our home computers, the struggle that most parents face is the fact that our children have the entire Internet in their pockets, and with a touch of their finger they can access everything that those parental controls and security software’s were meant to keep out.

 

With that said, in this blog I want to show parents how they can set the parental controls on their child’s iPhone.  I’ve received a lot of requests from parents on this exact issue, so here it is.  I tested it all out myself, and it’s safe to say that it does what it’s supposed to do.  By following this guide, you’ll be able to lock out certain iPhone features altogether, including Safari.

 

First things first – Go into the phones Settings.

 

Once in Settings, go to the tab called “General”

 

 

Next, scroll down and look for the tab called “Restrictions”.  Currently, it should say “Off”.

 

Once you’ve tapped on that, at the top, click on “Enable Restrictions”.  This will trigger a prompt for a password.  Don’t forget this password, there’s no way to retrieve it.

 

 

Once you’ve done this you’ll be able to disable any functions that you see on the screen.  Disabling a function, like Safari or YouTube, removes that icon completely from the iPhone’s interface.

 

Re-enabling these functions is as simple as following the same steps, re-entering your password, and turning the functions back on.  Again, this password is for YOU, the parent, to know, not your kids!

Thank you, Mary Kay Hoal for another post that helps us keep our families safe online.

Mary Kay Hoal‘s original post can be found here – “Parents Guide to the iPhones’s Parental Controls

Mary Kay Hoal is a married mother of five children (both biological and adopted) ranging in age from 6 to 19 years of age. She is an accomplished media professional who took it upon herself to leave a successful career and take action to make safety and privacy a key priority for children online. She founded her own company, Yoursphere Media Inc., and launched Yoursphere.com and YoursphereForParents.com.

Click on these links to find out more about Mary Kay Hoal and YourSphere.

Mary Kay is one of my favorite internet safety advocates. I am thankful she decided to provide a safe social network site for our kids.  One of the reasons YourSphere is successful is her experience as a mother of five kids.  Her family support and feedback help her to reach out to kids this age and figure out what they want.

And when I look at this picture, it confirms the love, support and fun that surrounds her.


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2 comments to Parents Guide to the iPhone’s Parental Controls

  • Cammie

    One thing to remember is that these restrictions are only on the iPhone settings (apps). This does not restrict Safari or YouTube, if you are concerned with those, please disable them in the Settings.

    Also, be aware that kids will purchase free apps that are internet browsers. Some of these include Google, Bing, Opera, Skyfire and more. These browsers will not be filtered.

    Some options include disabling Safari and purchasing a filtering browser that allows you to set up controls. Some of these apps include Safe Browser by Mobicip, BSecure, K9 Web Protection and Safe Eyes. Recommendations depend on what you want it to do and how much you will pay.

  • I love the step-by-step instructions, but really…why should kids even have internet-capable phones? That is just opening you up for more problems!